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Cyprus dispute – Division must not become permanent, Greek Cypriot president says

“Division must not become permanent”

Greek Cypriot president says

Introductory comment by Ralph Kratzer

What kind of game is being played here? While the Foreign Minister of Northern Cyprus, Özdil Nami, announced in a TV interview that the current peace talks have “collapsed” (click here!) and I parallely read in the German newspaper “Badische Zeitung” that many Greek Cypriots feel little desire for a reunification under the condition of a federation with two autonomous states (quote : … for [Greek Cypriot] Stelios Hadjiyianis, student of political science, only “all or nothing” comes into question: either the restoration of conditions before the [1974] “invasion” or the continuation of the division of the island between Turks and Greeks …. the current standstill of talks after a hopeful beginning is not a cause of concern for many Greek Cypriots. “Honestly, I’m even happy,” says political science student Stelios, he can not imagine a living together with Turks in the same state: “once they are there, they will roll over us Greeks…”), the Greek Cypriot President Anastasiades proclaimed, he could not imagine a permanent separation of the island!

May every reader form his/her own opinion!

Note: Terms such as “Turkish invasion” and “occupied areas” are Greek Cypriot nomenclature, more correctly is “Turkish peace intervention” and “Northern Cyprus or TRNC”.

And this is the concerning article in the Greek Cypriot “Cyprus Mail”:

Eroglu and Anastasiades

TC president Eroglu and GC president Anastasiades

The island’s current division must not be allowed to become permanent, Greek Cypriot president Nicos Anastasiades said, ahead of the 40th anniversary of the [by Greek Cypriots called] “Turkish invasion”.

He also said that the tragedy of the “invasion” must not be allowed to run full circle.

In a statement to Cyprus News Agency, Anastasiades expressed the belief that current conditions allow a win-win solution of the Cyprus problem, provided the Turkish Cypriot side and Turkey understand this.

He noted that a solution that will safeguard the rights of Greek Cypriots, without denying the rights of Turkish Cypriots, was feasible.

And a solution would have political, social, and financial benefits.

“With the Cyprus problem solved, there will be more opportunities to exploit the hydrocarbon reserves in the Eastern Mediterranean and create conditions of reconciliation between Greece and Turkey,” he said.

“At the same time the solution will help consolidate a sentiment of stability and bring significant investments to the benefit of all the legal inhabitants of the country.”

Anastasiades added that the future of the country and its children would be brighter and more hopeful if the obstacles were overcome and the dividing lines were abolished through a federal Cyprus, in which the EU acquis communautaire would be applicable from Paphos to Karpasia and from Limassol to Kyrenia.

Describing the invasion as a tragic event, the president said “the expulsion of the Greek population from the occupied part of Cyprus, the settlement of all Turkish Cypriots in the northern part of Cyprus and the organized colonization of the [by Greek Cypriots called] “occupied areas” by Turkey, have created a new reality on the ground.”

He warned of the risk of “this temporary” state of affairs turning permanent

“What I am concerned and anxious about is not to allow the permanent division of Cyprus. My message on the occasion of this anniversary is that we have to prevent this tragedy to complete its course.”

Asked about current prospects of a political settlement, the [Greek Cypriot] president expressed the belief that “today we have the prerequisites that will allow a win-win solution as long as the Turkish Cypriot side and Turkey understand this.”

Cyprus, he added, has a regional role to play which is much greater than its size, once its political problem is resolved.

“The geopolitical balance in the region is being redesigned,” he said. “Cyprus is the only country in our region that can become the best example of coexistence of Christians and Muslims, that will maintain excellent relations with Israel and with all Arab countries.”

The solution, he pointed out, “will bring many benefits and I see no reason why we shall not be able to achieve this. “

“My wish and my hope is that the other side will understand the dynamics of this period to that we will be celebrating the anniversary of the solution and not the sad anniversary of the tragedy of 1974,” he said.

Source: Cyprus Mail

3 replies »

  1. We will NEVER live as a minority with minority rights in any reunification process. Either a 2 state confederal solution or full recognition of the North.

  2. We all know what happened after 1960 with minority rights. The British politicians who set up the deal should all be shot. I know they are probably all dead, so dig them up and make sure they know what a c**k up they made.