Cyprus and bird trapping

By Chris Elliott

Every year we hear the crack of guns going off in North Cyprus as the hunters resume their sport of shooting and birds and animals are the unlucky victims.

Perhaps in older times in both North and South Cyprus there has been a lucrative trade in the trapping of birds with limesticks and mist nets but now this practice seems almost Bird trapped in a Cyprus mist netexclusively confined to South Cyprus where in fact it has been classified as an illegal act since 1974.

Nevertheless this cruel practice still continues with lots of money being made from capturing birds which are then passed on for bottling as the Ambelopoulia delicacy which is consumed with great delight and relish by some diners. Many people eat meat and the debate is, in bringing  it to the table, has the animal or bird has been caused unnecessary suffering and does it pose a threat to the local ecology.

Reading a past article in the Cyprus Mail it was surprising to learn that not only are big sums of money still being made through this illegal trade but more surprisingly, that according to the report, Cyprus is losing millions in tourism revenue Ambellopoulia on sale at the marketover bird trapping.

Whilst we may have concern for this awful trade in South Cyprus, we can only lobby where we can to have it stopped. Here in North Cyprus the illegal trade has been almost eradicated and there are many pressure groups working hard and successfully to make sure this trade never returns.

Fresh in on the internet is a new report from the BBC News about the UK sovereign base areas (SBAs) in Cyprus that have become illegal bird-trapping “hotspots”, according to research.

To learn more of these reports from Cyprus Mail and the BBC News, please follow the link below.

Cyprus losing millions in tourism revenue over bird trapping | Cyprus Mail.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25433008